RECENT NEWS ARTICLES

This page contains a selection of recent news articles and commentary about male victims of violence and abuse plus related issues. These articles are presented as a community service, and do not necessarily reflect the views of the One in Three Campaign.

Please send any relevant news articles to us by clicking here and we will post them on this page.

Thursday
Jul282016

Middlesex University researcher seeks male victims/survivors to interview for research project

We have been contacted by Clara Jones, a Masters student at Middlesex University, who is writing a dissertation on the topic of domestic violence against male victims/survivors. The purpose of the research is to gain an in-depth understanding of male victims’/survivors’ experiences of domestic violence and the support that they have been able to access, as this is an important issue where there is relatively little academic research.

Clara is currently looking for male victims/survivors of domestic violence who would be interested in being interviewed for her research. If you agree to take part, you would be interviewed either online over a Skype call, or in a confidential pre-booked private room at Middlesex University (your preference). The interview is likely to take around 45 minutes. As this is an extremely sensitive topic; therefore, everything that you say would remain confidential and anonymous.

You can find out information, as well as contact details for Clara, in a PDF document available here.

Saturday
Jul092016

The Denial of Female Domestic Violence (Dr Augusto Zimmermann, Quadrant, July-August 2016)

You may have seen the campaign against domestic violence running on Australian television. These ads are part of a $30 million federal campaign designed ‘to help break the cycle of violence against women and their children’. Curiously, it seems to suggest that all of the perpetrators are strictly Caucasian males.

We must speak out loudly and clearly about domestic violence against women, but men and children are also victims of such violence. And yet, from the media reports, public inquiries and official campaigns one would be forgiven to believe that men are the sole perpetrators of domestic violence – and that all men are equally likely to carry out such acts of violence.

The feminist lobby exerts constant pressure to present domestic violence solely as a ‘male problem’, to place all the blame for domestic violence on men as a group. As a result, and based on a radical feminist theory that addresses domestic violence primarily as a male issue that is predicated on so-called ‘patriarchy’, male victims are frequently met with disbelief, even suspicion, when they seek protection from a violent female partner.

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Jun292016

AIFS "Experiences of Separated Parents Study" reveals high levels of domestic violence against men

A recent Australian study has disproved the claim that men rarely experience violence, abuse, fear, control and coersion after separation.

In October 2015, the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) released its Experiences of Separated Parents Study - part of its evaluation of the 2012 family violence amendments by the Federal Government.

The study examined the experiences of two cohorts of parents, in 2012 and 2014, the latter a total of 6,079 parents who separated between 1 July 2012 and 31 December 2013, representing parents’ post-reform experience of the family law system.

The data indicate that family violence is a common experience among separated parents, with a majority of participating parents in both cohorts reporting either physical or emotional abuse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These figures make a lie of the oft-repeated claim that "men rarely experience post-separation violence" (for example, here, here, here, here, here, here, here and here). There was no statistically significant difference between fathers and mothers in the frequency of reporting having often felt fearful after experiencing physical violence or emotional abuse since separation, and fathers were statistically significantly more likely than mothers to report having often felt controlled or coerced after experiencing physical violence or emotional abuse since separation. When it came to severity, fathers were also more likely than mothers to report experiencing the highest level of fear, control and coersion (10 on a 10-point scale) that they felt arising from the focus parent’s behaviour since separation. Experiences of control and coersion were statistically significantly higher for fathers than mothers.

The study found that males (fathers) made up:

  • 41.3% of parents who reported experiencing physical hurt (with or without emotional abuse) before/during separation

  • 51.8% of parents who reported experiencing emotional abuse alone before/during separation. In 2 out of 11 types of emotional abuse, fathers reported experiencing abuse “often” at equal or higher rates than mothers.

  • 34.6% of parents who reported experiencing between 21 and 55 incidents of emotional abuse before/during separation, and 45.5% of parents who reported between 11 and 20 incidents

  • 42.6% of parents who reported experiencing the highest levels of severity of fear (9 or 10 on a 10-point scale) before/during separation, 43.5% of parents who reported experiencing the most severe control, and 44.6% of parents who reported experiencing the most severe coersion

  • 45.5% of parents who reported experiencing physical hurt since separation

  • 47.4% of parents who reported experiencing emotional abuse (with or without physical hurt) since separation. In 4 out of 13 types of emotional abuse, fathers reported experiencing abuse at equal or higher rates than mothers. In 7 out of 11 types of emotional abuse, fathers reported experiencing abuse “often” at equal or higher rates than mothers.

  • 41.2% of parents who reported experiencing between 21 and 55 incidents of emotional abuse since separation, and 47.2% of parents who reported between 11 and 20 incidents

  • 46.5% of parents who reported often feeling fearful after physical violence since separation, and 48.1% after emotional abuse alone

  • 57.3% of parents who reported often feeling controlled after physical violence since separation, and 59.5% after emotional abuse alone

  • 57.4% of parents who reported often feeling coerced after physical violence since separation, and 60.5% after emotional abuse alone

  • 51.7% of parents who reported experiencing the highest levels of severity of fear (9 or 10 on a 10-point scale) since separation, 60.5% of parents who reported experiencing the most severe control, and 57.6% of parents who reported experiencing the most severe coersion.

The full report can be downloaded from aifs.gov.au/sites/default/files/publication-documents/efva-esps_0.pdf.

Saturday
Jun112016

‘There is nowhere for us to go’: Domestic violence happens to men too (news.com.au)

Often violence against men is reactionary or not physical. But Nick’s case seems pretty clear cut.

The first time Nick’s* wife punched him in the face was because he hadn’t cleaned the bathtub properly.

“At the time I felt that it was my job to fix it,” Nick says, “the male mentality is often that you fix things.”

It was the year after they married and looking back, 45-year-old Nick can see the violence didn’t come out of the blue. His wife — we’ll call her Imogen — was continually picking aggressive verbal arguments with him over minor domestic things, such as how he’d pegged out the clothes on the clothesline.

“One minute she’s lying in a foetal position on the floor and the next, she’s screaming at you that you don’t pay enough attention or you’ve done something wrong,” he says.

Right from the outset, Nick says Imogen worked towards isolating him from his close-knit family.

Click here to read the full story.

Sunday
Jun052016

Surrey Police launch excellent #behindcloseddoors domestic abuse campaign (UK)

About the Behind Closed Doors campaign

Statistically one in four women and one in six men suffer from domestic abuse, and within these abusive relationships a vast percentage are non-violent. These relationships operate on the premise of take take take.

Victims are isolated, controlled, told how to dress, what to eat, when to sleep. They are not allowed to work and are manipulated by threats of violence, rape, or the intervention of social services to take away children. They are humiliated and degraded, and reality is continuous fear and uncertainty.

This is coercive control. This is domestic abuse, and is now a crime in its own right.

The offence of Coercive and Controlling behaviour can be considered if “the perpetrators behaviour has had “serious effect” on the victim, meaning that it has caused the victim to fear violence will be used against them on at least two occasions or it has had a substantial adverse effect on the victims day to day activities.” The maximum prison term is five years.

That is why the Surrey Against Domestic Abuse partnership has launched a campaign to promote the help and support available to people experiencing domestic abuse. Named ‘Give and Take’, this campaign also seeks to make friends and family of those who are being abused by a partner or family member more aware of their role in taking action. Domestic abuse can happen to both men and women and regardless of sexual orientation, ethnicity, age, class, religion or physical ability.

Throughout the campaign, we will be using the hashtag #behindcloseddoors on Twitter. Join in the conversation and help us encourage more people to seek support and safety.

If you know someone who is experiencing domestic abuse, take action. You can do this by:

1. Calling Surrey Police on 101 or 999 in an emergency.

2. Calling the 24 hour yourSanctuary helpline for information and advice on 01483 776822.

More info http://www.surreyagainstda.info/news/behind-closed-doors/.