HISTORY OF THE CAMPAIGN

In 2009, the founders of the One in Three Campaign (a diverse group of men and women: academics, researchers, social workers, psychologists, counsellors, trainers, activists and victim/survivors – many of whom are listed on the supporters page) felt that we could no longer retain our moral or intellectual integrity by ignoring the authoritative and growing body of data that indicates males are a substantial proportion of victims of family violence and abuse.

While welcoming the advances that have taken place over recent decades to support women and children suffering from violence, we acknowledge that there is a complete lack of programs, services and support to help men in the same situation. We feel that it is unjust and inequitable to abhor only that violence done to women and children while ignoring violence done to men.

Even if we were to privilege the welfare of women and children over men, we would still have to address violence and abuse done to husbands, fathers, sons, brothers, grandfathers, uncles, nephews, friends, neighbours and colleagues; because the essence of reality is relationship, and there is no escaping the fact that we are interdependent, that we are part of one another. Our welfare is inseparably intertwined.

You can get involved in a number of ways. Read our 5 Year ReportAdd your name to the growing list of supporters of the campaign. Send an email to our political leaders, asking them to provide services and support for male victims. Spread the word about the Campaign and website. If you are a male victim yourself, please have the courage to tell your story so that this issue can emerge from the shadows. Thank you for your support.

The One in Three Campaign Founders
19th November 2009

Almost everything I did that wasn’t done with her constituted a threat to her. By the end of the relationship I had no friends. I had no outside activities. I had nothing, because everything that I was interested in, every friendship I had, threatened her. She would make things so difficult for my friends that they just drifted away. Scott